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Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages and Linguistics

 

Dr Ivan Kozachenko

Ivan Kozachenko
Position(s): 
Postdoctoral Research Associate in Ukrainian Studies
Department/Section: 
Slavonic Studies
Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages
Contact details: 
Location: 

Faculty of Modern & Medieval Languages
Raised Faculty Building
University of Cambridge
Sidgwick Avenue
Cambridge
CB3 9DA
United Kingdom

About: 

Ivan Kozachenko holds a Postdoctoral Research Associate position that is attached both to the ‘Multilingualism: Empowering Individuals, Transforming Societies’ project and the Ukrainian Studies Programme, Department of Slavonic Studies. His current project focuses on the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine in which he investigates how linguistic unity, diversity, power and identity are reflected in social media discourses. The study also considers how Ukraine is being 're-narrated' by writers, poets, politicians, and intellectuals since the Euromaidan revolution of 2013-14.

Prior to arriving in Cambridge, Dr Kozachenko was a Stasiuk Postdoctoral Fellow at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, where he worked on the project ‘The Ukraine Crisis: Contested Identities, Social Media and Transnationalism’ that investigated the role played by social media for contemporary social movements in Ukraine during and after the Euromaidan. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Aberdeen.

Research interests: 

Diaspora and social movement studies, languages and identities, post-Soviet societies, nationalism, historical memory, ethnographic research methods, online research methods.

Published works: 

 

Selected publications

  • Diasporic Nation-Building: Re-Invention of National Belonging within Ukrainian Diasporas, in Democracy, Diaspora and Ukraine, Olga Oleinikova and Jumana Bayeh (eds.), Routledge, forthcoming 2019.
  • Fighting for the Soviet Union 2.0: Digital Nostalgia and National Belonging in the Context of Ukraine Crisis, Communist and Post-Communist Studies, vol. 52, no.1, 2019, pp. 1 – 10.
  • ‘Re-Imagining’ the Homeland? Languages and National Belonging in Ukrainian Diasporas since the Euromaidan, East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies, vol. 5, no. 2, 2018, pp. 89-109.
  • Retelling Old Stories with New Media: National Identity and Transnationalism in the ‘Russian Spring’ Popular Uprisings, East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies, vol. 4, no. 1, 2017, pp. 137 – 158.
  • The Post-Soviet Hangover: Defending Pluralism of Identities in the Baltic Countries (in Russian), together with Timofey Agarin, Etnograficheskoe Obozrenie, no. 2, 2017, pp. 54 – 63.

Selected commentary