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Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages and Linguistics

 

The Slavonic Studies Section presents 'Rethinking Slavonic Studies' Lecture Series 2022-23

The Slavonic Studies Section of the University of Cambridge and the Cambridge Committee for Russian and East European Studies (CamCREES) invite you to a series of guest speaker talks over the 2022-23 academic year, entitled

 

Rethinking Slavonic Studies

 

The series aims to address urgent questions for the study of Slavonic cultures as well as Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia more generally in the context of Russia's ongoing war on Ukraine.

Among other subjects, this international and multi-disciplinary series will examine various imperial legacies, marginalised discourses, and postcolonial (or decolonising) frames, with a particular emphasis on Ukrainian perspectives.

The talks will take place fortnightly in Michaelmas and Lent Terms on Thursday (NB: Except for 23 November event), from 5.30pm, in the Knox Shaw Room, Sidney Sussex College.

 

Download the programme here

 

13 October 2022 Olesya Khromeychuk (Ukrainian Institute, London): ‘(Re)discovering Ukraine in the Context of Russia’s War’

 

27 October 2022 Irina Borogan and Andrei Soldatov (Center for European Policy Analysis), Laurie Bristow (Hughes Hall, Former UK Ambassador to Russian Federation): ‘Relations with Russia Now and in the Future’

 

10 November 2022 Sasha Dovzhyk (UCL SSEES): ‘Ukrainian Cassandras’

 

23 November 2022 Emily Greble (Vanderbilt University): ‘The Centre at the Periphery: Rethinking Slavonic Studies through Muslim Narratives’

 

26 January 2023 Adalyat Issiyeva (McGill University): ‘Out of Silence: Listening to the (Muted?) Voices of Russia's Subjects’

 

9 February 2023 Olenka Pevny (University of Cambridge): ‘“Invisible Rus”: The Omitted History of Eastern Europe’

 

23 February 2023 Michael Moser (University of Vienna): ‘Revisiting the History of the Ukrainian Language’

 

9 March 2023 Clare Cavanagh (Northwestern University): ‘Portable Provinces: The Postcolonial Vision of Czesław Miłosz’